Doctor Who XXXV/9.8: The Zygon Inversion

Art by Stuart Manning, stuart-manning.tumblr.com

Art by Stuart Manning, stuart-manning.tumblr.com

We didn’t need the Z-67, then. (‘Zee’ sixty-seven. Another small sign that this is an international series for a global market.) It was all long gone. The threat, or the temptation, of destruction was enough. The Zygons were never going to be turned inside out at a physical level, but they and human beings have to have their perceptions inverted again and again and again. The solution to the Zygon rising isn’t a happy one. People from both human and Zygon species are killed. It’s difficult to see Bonnie’s instruction to stand down having the effect on her fellow Zygon rebels which the script seems at first glance to suggest. I’d initially thought that the reference to this being the sixteenth time the Doctor has gone through the Osgood box version of Deal or No Deal was that there had been fifteen previous separate Zygon risings, but Andrew Ellard on Twitter has pointed out that this is the more problematic interpretation and the idea that this is the sixteenth version involving these participants makes more sense. Until reading this I’d thought that the point was that the ceasefire has broken down before and will break down again. It’s a striking, perhaps worrying, utilitarian line for Doctor Who to take: the Doctor will keep coming back to minimise the number of deaths and damage to self-knowledge in the hope of saving as many as possible; but changing the mind of just one, in the right place, might be enough, or the most that can be hoped for. It’s a compromise and compromises are messy; but there is a future visible where the difference between human and Zygon is no longer of importance, something perhaps difficult even for the Doctor to grasp. Assimilation is mutual and subtle even if the Zygons have been smuggled in and disguised by an organisation operating beyond the state and outside democratic control.

Social media, with the exception of a few people with reservations and perhaps deliberate contrarians, emerged from their pods in force to cheer The Zygon Inversion. Peter Capaldi’s speech in particular was loved. This was a little overlong, but was still a bravura delivery of a clever relation of the Zygon peace to the Time War (of which the Zygons, lest we forget, were victims), the bleak efficacy of mutually assured destruction scenarios, and a reminder of the place which Clara Oswald has in the Doctor’s cosmology. I don’t know how Capaldi’s drawing quite specifically on Hughie Green’s delivery and catchphrase when in his game show host persona played with those who don’t remember Green; did it work as generically as presumably hoped?

This wasn’t entirely brilliant. I found some of the journey of the Doctor and Osgood a little flat; the Union Jack parachute was an odd touch, a sideswipe at an outdated model of James Bond, perhaps, a sign that someone somewhere has anxieties about the Doctor’s mode of heroism, or perhaps to underline how awkward this ‘president of Earth’ nonsense sits with the Doctor’s traditionally less bombastic way of doing business. Who, I wondered, was flying the UNIT plane, and did they escape? They had time…[EDIT – looking at the Doctor-Osgood exchanges again, she does some nice deconstruction and remembered analysis of the Doctor’s behaviour and methodology –  ‘You’re talking nonsense to distract me from being really scared’ – and is ahead of him at times because she’s got the emotional distance and focus to help him along. She’s too accomplished and too much of the fan-scholar to be a long-term companion, though, and this story gives her a firm and distinguished place in the series’ mythology.]

Amidst the failure, for me, of the Doctor-Osgood conversation to spark – despite the Doctor’s becoming, during it, a smiling figure more at peace with his existence – was the grisly and emotionally pained depiction of the Zygon forced to ‘normalise’ and go into hiding, unable to fully maintain a human shape, in the grocer’s. The make-up on Nicholas Asbury as Etoine was suggestive of a plague victim, with swollen glands and sores, as well as a reminder of the imagery of ulceration and bodies turned inside out, of overgrown malformed embryos, upon which the Zygon design draws. Both suggest the ambiguity of human beings’ (or at least western, Atlantic Anglophone culture’s) tendency to look for the unlike and unfamiliar, grouping difference with disease; Etoine’s suicide, arising from mistrust of the Doctor and Osgood but also a rejection of what Bonnie insisted he must become, was overwhelmingly sad but also helped turn around an episode which I wasn’t greatly committed to until then.

This two-parter has again sidelined the complicated Clara as a character while maintaining her as a symbol. Portraying the dual Clara/Bonnie felt a little like a graduation piece for Jenna Coleman, but it can be said that she passed. Clara’s dreamscape might have seemed like an old Steven Moffat trope, but it was used to illustrate how interwoven Zygon and human were and emphasise Clara’s strength of character beyond the ‘control freak’ label bandied about with freedom by Missy. Bonnie as angry adolescent motivated by an ideal of a society which would emerge from victory without any clear idea of the process by which that ideal would be built and maintained is a topical figure, recognisable to anyone who has seen a Boko Haram video. Taking Clara’s form and her memories, it’s stated, compromises her from the beginning, but also suggests that the Zygons are not otherable, but are part of us. Like Clara, she’s controlling and manipulative, but far more ruthless and far less able to see the consequences of her actions. There has been some concern expressed that Bonnie was able to escape with her crimes unpunished; but the point was surely that she is a transformed person, without and within. Kate leaves with her memory wiped because she still pressed the button [EDIT: No, she didn’t! Why did I think that?] (and Doctor Who needs her to go forward with science in her brain and gun in her hand – five rounds rapid, again). Bonnie does not because she understands and carries the burden of her crimes. Becoming a new Osgood is an extreme form of self-sentenced community service.

At the end of the day, though, it’s Capaldi’s confident handling of the Doctor as teacher-hero which lingers in the memory. He’s been around two thousand years but he’s not a messiah, just someone managing his own messiah complex by doing the best he can, and not blind to the unpleasantness which transpires along the way as a result. He can’t condemn Kate as she kills her way through the Zygons in self-defence; and she knows it. While I found the ‘Doctor Disco’ business tiresome, that’s a response the episode expects; this isn’t so much a man in mid-life crisis as a man suffering from second regeneration cycle or unexpected fourteenth life trauma, and sublimating his concern about his place in events.

[EDIT: One further note is that the Doctor is making a habit of making people like himself. Clara has been portrayed as a second Doctor with her own adventures and companions. Ashildr/Me is someone he changes into an immortal and then groups with him as ‘people like us’. Now Bonnie is praised for thinking ‘like me’. Messiah and very naughty boy at once, the Doctor recruits through words and touch, but his truth is not in charge of the consequences.]

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Posted on 7 November 2015, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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