Doctor Who XXXIV(8).2: Into the Dalek – afterthoughts

I love Doctor Who and tend to concentrate on the positive in my reviews, or more accurately the intellectually or creatively interesting or amusing things about each episode. However, I’ve read some negative comments about Into the Dalek and they trouble me because they point to wider problems.

Firstly there’s the issue of narrative compression within the forty-five minute episode. I’d not thought of it myself, but some writers I’ve come across have a point when they suggest that too many ideas are being set up for dramatic effect and then lost. The Doctor is sentenced to death by Colonel Blue – the Pinks and Blues must be an allusion to co-writer Phil Ford’s time with Spectrum as lead writer on the reimagined 2000s  version of Captain Scarlet – but is then allowed to leave the rebel base in the TARDIS to collect Clara, when the rebels have no guarantee that he isn’t a Dalek duplicate (a pleasing enough nod to Resurrection of the Daleks) or that he will return to help them. He could at least have had a Revenge of the Cybermen-like bomb strapped to his back, a further incentive to a somewhat annoyed Clara to come with him.

I wasn’t greatly impressed by the Doctor having abandoned Clara in Glasgow, either – it damaged the effect of their walking off together in their final scene in Deep Breath. Alternatively, this shows how patient Clara is with the new Doctor, a man far more overtly conscious of and worried by his lack of self-knowledge than his previous self.

Clara has to be patient given that the Doctor seems to like insulting her. It’s not true that he hardly notices that she’s a girl, as the publicity says; instead he plays on anxieties such as age and body shape. Clara seems at least able to put these down, but I was reminded of the defenders of the portrayal of the Danes in one of the Beowulf films of the last decade after I’d reviewed their bar-room lascivious aggression negatively, who told me that men are the same the world and time over. Perhaps, but not like that. Clara’s struggle through the channel was reminiscent of Sarah Jane Smith’s through the service duct in part four of The Ark in Space, but the fourth Doctor’s goading was a more general jibe at ‘girls like you’ rather than the ‘built like a man’ line. Perhaps it was meant to suggest that after the lusty and sometimes lustful eleventh Doctor, the twelfth sees Clara as androgynous, but I can feel the offensiveness of the line given that it draws attention to the very femininity (thankfully less decorative this year so far) that has been part of the presentation of Clara in the series.

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Posted on 1 September 2014, in doctor who reviews and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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